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The final episodes of Beck, the longest-running Swedish film series of all time, are now streaming in the U.S. on MHz Choice. Watch online, on your TV or favorite device – start your free 30-day trial at mhzchoice.com! Here’s Part 3 of a guide to all the new episodes, with exclusive commentary from directors Jörgen Bergmark and Mårten Klingberg. Bergmark is a veteran writer and director with episodes of Sebastian Bergman, Arne Dahl and Camilla Läckberg’s Fjällbacka Murders to his credit. In addition to being an experienced director, Klingberg is also an actor with impeccable Beck credentials: he played policeman Nick Ingvar, half of the “Nick and Robban” duo, throughout Season 2!


Season 5, Episode 6: Steinar

 An internal power struggle grips Beck’s team as they investigate a trailer park fire.

Premieres September 27th
Director’s notes: “In this film, we become acquainted with the Beck group’s newest addition, Steinar Hovland (played by Kristofer Hivju from HBO’s Game of Thrones). He and the other officers on the team take on a case that is centred around several socially-maladjusted individuals who live in a dilapidated caravan park on the outskirts of the city. The otherwise affluent suburb is divided between those who want to help this vulnerable population – and those who want to get rid of the “scum.” The episode highlights parenting – Steinar’s, as well as several of the other characters’. How do we take care of our young people when they feel betrayed and close themselves off? And how do we prevent those who are supposed to protect them from shamelessly exploiting their position? In this story, there is more than one person hiding a secret, which makes the case unusually difficult to solve. The plot is complicated in a natural way, by the chain of dependency-based relationships that form its foundation. The new composition of the Beck group, which is plagued by a grave power struggle, doesn’t make things easier. Steinar is a “relationship drama dressed up as a crime story,” perhaps more so than any of my previous Beck films – and as such is the episode in the series of which I am most proud.” – Mårten Klingberg, 2015


Season 5, Episode 7: End of the Road

Beck investigates the murder of an ex-cop and his family, and Oskar and Steinar face trouble on the home front.

Premieres September 27th
Director’s notes: “Sweden is said to be one of the world’s least corrupt countries, and according to research, Swedish citizens believe that to be the case. We trust our public officials. My imagination was sparked by the idea of exploring integrity and honesty in the police. How law-abiding is the group that is employed to ensure that other citizens follow the law? Even though this is a fictional story, Stefan Thunberg who wrote the thrilling script, did thorough research which showed that some police officers are willing to go far in order to achieve results. The question is, how far? The question was also how far Steinar was willing to go in order to incriminate his colleagues, and how far he has to go to save his daughter? This film is driven by several interesting themes and conflicts: different kinds of loyalty, secrets and lies, and the ways that power corrupts. It was interesting to approach Martin’s increasingly complicated relationship to Gunilla, who is married, and follow his ongoing conflict with his supervisor, Klas Fredén, as it escalates to its final conclusion. And now that Steinar has been established in the series, it is exciting to deepen his character as he faces some very complicated dilemmas.” – Jörgen Bergmark, 2015


Season 5, Episode 8: The Last Day

A routine traffic stop ends in tragedy, and Martin makes a momentous decision about his future.

Premieres September 27th
Director’s notes: “One of the production practices established with the latest Beck films, is that the writers group controls the process of developing new stories. Through this, we opened up many possibilities. For example, allowing an episode to unfold over a single day is something that hasn’t been done with the Beck series before. Spending so much time with the perpetrator is also unusual. In short, there were a number of exciting opportunities to take on as director. How could we humanize a person who commits acts like these, for example? And how is police work portrayed when so much is at stake? Simon J. Berger plays the role of the teacher, Stefan, with great sensitivity. In the few scenes that he actually says something, he is presented as a human being, like any one of us. His final showdown with the world around him isn’t mysterious, but rather the tragic consequence of a series of circumstances over which he has no control. Antonia Pyk has written a tight and exciting script that combines thrilling action with sensitive character depictions. And then we have Martin Beck’s personal dilemma: his feelings of dejection as his work no longer seems to matter. Dealing with the resignation of the country’s most popular police officer was a true challenge!” – Jörgen Bergmark, 2015